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griseus:

Is moth week and I can’t be out!! the fish family Pegasidae, aka sea moths, includes just five species (placed in two genera) but is represented in temperate and tropical coastal zones throughout the Indo-Pacific. All sea moths are small (no more than than ~180 mm total length), benthic (bottom-dwelling), and very well camouflaged. Seamoths have modified pelvic fins that allow them to “walk” across the sea bottom where they live.

A curious behavior seen in these fish (almost in Eurypegasus draconis) is that they sheds their skins in one piece, probably every one to five days, a process described in some detail by Herold and Clark (1993). These researcher also discuss evidence suggesting monogamy in this species, as well as other aspects of social and reproductive behavior.

buggirl:

Thank you Toby at Spider Ask for your generous contribution!  It’s so nice that people that share the same love for the natural world are out there.  I am truly grateful.  And so are the spiders I will research!
Here is an injured gecko we found while conducting our research in Tiputini, Ecuador.
To help me continue to conduct research in the Amazon, and receive a public thank you to my 158,000+ followers, please donate (as little as a dollar!) here.
Zoom Info
Camera
Nikon COOLPIX AW110
ISO
200
Aperture
f/8.8
Exposure
1/30th
Focal Length
15mm

buggirl:

Thank you Toby at Spider Ask for your generous contribution!  It’s so nice that people that share the same love for the natural world are out there.  I am truly grateful.  And so are the spiders I will research!

Here is an injured gecko we found while conducting our research in Tiputini, Ecuador.

To help me continue to conduct research in the Amazon, and receive a public thank you to my 158,000+ followers, please donate (as little as a dollar!) here.

nubbsgalore:

photos by mike roberts, masa ushioda, peter liu and doug perrine of green sea turtles being cleaned by yellow tangs, goldring surgeonfish and saddle wrasse. by feeding on the algea and parasites which grow on the turtle shells, the fish not only keep them clean, but reduce drag, helping the turtles to swim faster. 

see also: butterflies drinking turtle tears 

libutron:

King Ratsnake  (Keeled ratsnake, Stinking goddess)

Elaphe carinata (Colubridae) is one of those snakes that have an intimidating appearance. It is a large, impressive, heavy-bodied snake that can reach up to 2.40m. A tear drop shaped pupil, jet black, surrounded by ring of golden orange, sets this apart from any Elaphe species.

This snake is commonly named the King ratsnake due to its habit of eating other snakes, the Keeled ratsnake because of its heavily keeled scales that give the skin a rough texture; and Stinking goddess due to the distinctive habit of releasing a strong, offensive odour from post-anal glands when handled or otherwise threatened. 

which can be found in in China, North Vietnam, Taiwan and Japan.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©kkchome | Locality: Taiwan

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